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Guillain-Barre syndrome in Sri Lanka: subtypes and trends

Authors:

Sudath M. Gunasekera ,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, LK
About Sudath M.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
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Kamal Gunarathna,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, LK
About Kamal
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
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Duminda Samarawickrama,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, LK
About Duminda
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
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D. M. W. Dharmakeerthi,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, LK
About D. M. W.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
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Hewa G. R. Sesath,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, LK
About Hewa G. R.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
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Ravindra L. Wijesekera,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, LK
About Ravindra L.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
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S. D. Perera

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, LK
About S. D.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
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Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) subtypes in Sri Lanka.

 

Design setting: The patients satisfying established criteria for diagnosis of GBS were included. The cases were classified into GBS subtypes based on electrodiagnostic findings.

 

Patient intervention: None

 

Measurements: Clinical neurophysiological evaluations were done. The studies were repeated as appropriate.

 

Results: The evaluations were done between 2 and 143 days from onset (median = 7 days). There were 1153 patients (Male: Female = 1.4 :1) with age 1 to 86 years (mean = 43.7). Of them 191 (16.6%) were below 13 years (Male: Female = 1.2:1). GBS subtypes were demyelinating type 577 (50%), axonal forms 475 (41.2%), Miller-Fisher syndrome 5 (0.4%) and unclassifiable 96 (8.3%). Among the children there were 99 (51.8%) with demyelinating type, 82 (42.9%) with axonal forms, 10 (5.2%) with unclassifiable findings and none with MFS. There was some clustering of both demyelinating and axonal cases in the early and late months of the year whereas in children there is excessive occurrence of GBS cases of both types in the first 5 months of the year. There is a second peak of axonal GBS later in the year. Overall tendency of reduction in the number of cases, especially axonal forms, is noticeable over the years.

 

Interpretation: The age and sex distribution of the cases is similar to that of other countries. The occurrence of axonal subtypes is prominent. The proportions of GBS subtypes and case clustering in children may be related to the preceding infection.

How to Cite: Gunasekera SM, Gunarathna K, Samarawickrama D, Dharmakeerthi DMW, Sesath HGR, Wijesekera RL, et al.. Guillain-Barre syndrome in Sri Lanka: subtypes and trends. Sri Lanka Journal of Neurology. 2012;1(1):10–3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/sljon.v1i1.110
Published on 30 Dec 2012.
Peer Reviewed

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